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My super foodie buddy and I took a trip to the UBC to check out the apple fest. Surprisingly, the place was super busy, mostly families but there were a few cute packs of girls. It seemed like a place where you could meet a really healthy girl with good teeth(an apple a day keeps the Dr away).

Admission was 2 bucks and the grounds will filled with tents selling all things apple, apple pie, apple cider, dried apples, caramel and candy apples, and of course bags of apples. It felt like a little bit of apple overdose, remember apple seeds have a little bit of poison in them (one of those things I learned from GI JOE). I bought a bag of dried apple chips (5 bucks) which were super and we got a pair of tickets for the apple tasting tent. There was also some beef chili that was stewed out of a modified jeep.

The apple tasting tent was fun but a little chaotic. People walking all different directions trying to get their fingers on some samples. My favourites included the senshu, yoko, and the Topaz. They also had the a new cross apple there named the SPA 493 created in Summerland, BC, I love the apple's clinical name and I am sure it will get some regular name once they have established that it is marketable.

We cut the tasting short to run to the parking lot to make sure we could buy a bag of the Topaz apples (6 bucks). They are amazing, and I have been sharing a few with friends and they all agree.

What is your favourite apple?

I generally dislike any apple that is waxed, the size of a softball, or is soft and mushy like a Macintosh. I prefer red apples to green or yellow ones. My perfect apple is red, fits in my palm nicely, firm, has a crisp bite, slightly chilled, extremely flavourful and a little tart. I found my new favourite apple, the Topaz (from Keremeos) at the UBC Apple Fest.

Here is some info on the Topaz.
Originating in the Czech Republic in 1984, this apple is a cross of Rubin (Lord Lambourne and Golden Delicious) X Vanda (Jolana and Lord Lambourne). The tree is resistant to mildew.

It is harvested in mid - October around Red Delicious time and will store until April in a cool dry place.

You can't but them in stores because there is only one orchard in BC, but if you get a chance to try this Cadillac of apples, please do.
Matt

3 comments

Anonymous said... @ October 20, 2009 at 4:33 PM

totally ignored the directions posted online and went to ubc figuring i could smell the cider. no signs anywhere for the event. got lost more. finally made it to the parking lot where they told me not to bother. ignored them, paid $5. hoped on shuttle. paid $4 in entry. ran to the cider table. GASP sold out. was a crotchity mess but bought a bag of 5 apples for $7 in attempt to not totally fail.

why on earth were they so expensive? and who drank all the cider? next year will arrive on day one at 11am.

Gyromite said... @ October 20, 2009 at 9:58 PM

Your post was better than mine. Nice read.

UBCgarden said... @ October 22, 2009 at 12:14 PM

Hi, I work for the UBC Botanical Garden and wanted to reply to the last post. I'm sorry that you had a frustrating time getting to the Botanical Garden and have written down your comments as suggestions for next year. As for selling out of cider and other products, because of the perishable nature of apples we always want to have sold them by the end of the weekend so we really do recommend that if there is something specific that you'd like to buy that you arrive early on the first day. A lot of the apples are grown by small growers and the amount they provide us is all they are able to sell due to their size. So, much like a farmers market we do sell out just based on availability. That being said, there were lots of other activities like the tasting tent, children's area, and longest peel contest that were available right until we shut the doors on Sunday at 4pm, and admission to the Garden is usually $8, so getting in for 2 is a special in itself! If you have any additional feedback for Apple Fest I encourage you to send them through to us at botg @ interchange.ubc.ca

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