HST
| 11 comments ]



I received an email from a reader regarding the HST and a campaign that was created in response called No Meal Tax. The No Meal Tax campaign was created by the Canadian and BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association in a fight to exempt the restaurant industry from HST. They have created a website that serves as an online petition. If you want to make a stand against HST on the restaurant industry check out
www.nomealtax.ca

I haven't been following the details behind HST and the restaurant industry in detail but I will dedicate sometime this weekend to do some research. There is no question that this will have a serious affect on the restaurant industry resulting in many restaurants closing their doors and obviously I am not down with paying an extra 7% on my meals. Come to think of it, HST may shut this blog down.

I do/did favour the carbon tax but I will have to do some more extensive reading on this one. Regardless of my stance there should be a forum for those who oppose the HST and nomealtax.ca is the this forum.

If you have some thoughts on HST, let me hear em.

11 comments

J-Free said... @ December 15, 2009 at 11:34 PM

there won't be many people happy paying 12% tax and 15% plus for tipping, paying 20% over listed price is bad enough

Anonymous said... @ December 16, 2009 at 6:32 AM

food suppliers may pass their savings onto restaurants because their suppliers will be paying less.

so restaurants should be able to lower their price by 7%.

http://www.gov.bc.ca/hst/Documents/HST_How_It_Works.pdf

Gyromite said... @ December 16, 2009 at 7:48 AM

Yeah, I read that but that graphic didn't make sense to me. I didn't think people paid tax on food and companies can apply for a PST number to exempt them from paying PST on raw materials.

The model on the website doesn't really explain that there are lots of PST exempt items in the current system.

Matt

gillian said... @ December 16, 2009 at 8:49 AM

Your link goes to nomealtax.com not .ca FYI

Livie said... @ December 16, 2009 at 12:24 PM

Thanks for posting this. just to clarify the PST is currently exempt on restaurant meals but after the HST is implemented on July 1, it will apply to all restaurant, fast food, and even coffee bills. That is an additional 7% on the 5% you are now paying.

Theoretically, yes the HST is supposed to help businesses save on administrative costs but how many may pass them onto consumers? Also many restaurants are already suffering due to the economic receession so this is just poor timing from the government.

Tia said... @ December 16, 2009 at 12:51 PM

i hate this whole HST thing... thanks for the link.

J-Free said... @ December 16, 2009 at 5:09 PM

"food suppliers may pass their savings onto restaurants because their suppliers will be paying less."

i hardly expect that to happen, in all likeliness they'd pocket the 7%

i'll be eating more at "cash only" joints, no way i'm gonna put down up to 30% plus mark up just to not eat at hoome

lijuan said... @ December 16, 2009 at 6:47 PM

top edhardy jean www.lookedhardy.com

Anonymous said... @ December 16, 2009 at 8:44 PM

I agree it will cause people to eat less but they will get over it, we love our restaurants. I am not in favour of taxes but why should one industry be free of tax and not another? Ontario has always paid PST on restaurant eating. We have paid 105 on booze, that will go away.The HST is a refundable tax for businesses where PST is not. A $100,000 renovation will now cost a restaraunt $100,000 not $107,000 and the knives and fridges etc are going to be 7% cheaper. HST will add costs to consumers but kill restaurants? Only the bad ones.

Anonymous said... @ December 17, 2009 at 12:45 PM

Who cares?

We pay pretty low taxes for the social & economic support we receive as Canadians. Look at some EU countries and what they pay for taxes.

People want their cake and eat it too it seems. If a 7% tax on my dinner helps pay for education and health care, I don't really mind it at all. People need to get their heads outta their asses.

Anonymous said... @ January 7, 2010 at 2:32 PM

Well, a goods and service tax is suppose to apply to everything and then certain items are exempted on the basis that they are required to live (ie basic groceries) so taxes them would hurt the poorest in society.

I don't really consider restaurants a necessity or foodies poor. If a tax is suppose to apply to everything, why should restaurants be exempt?

Post a Comment